April 26, 2013


February 10, 2012

The International Space Station flew over Sugar Land, TX tonight. It was really bright -- heavens-above.com estimated it would be -3.6 magnitude. The ISS went into the earth's shadow during the pass and so disappeared still high in the NE sky with a reddish orange glow. Jupiter is the bright object center right. Canon 7D, 10-22mm @ 10mm, f/6.3, ISO 640. Set of five 30-second images.


August 12, 2011

The International Space Station as seen from Sugar Land, Texas. The ISS flew over the Gulf of Mexico and the eastern United States. The center of the image is looking southeast. Four 30-second exposures.


July 28, 2009

The ISS and the Space Shuttle Endeavour. View to the northwest.

They went almost directly overhead. Stack of two images. The Space Shuttle is the fainter streak and had undocked from the ISS a few hours earlier in the day.

The ISS and the Space Shuttle Endeavour. View to the southeast.

Stack of three images.


June 12, 2008

ISS

The International Space Station as seen from Sugar Land, Texas on June 12, 2008. This image is a composite of six 30-second photos. The photos were taken with a Canon 30D set at ISO 500 with a 10-22mm lens at f/5.6. The Space Shuttle Discovery could also be seen during the flyover, but it took the same arc as the ISS and so cannot be seen in the image.


April 13, 2008

International Space Station flyover

The International Space Station as seen from Sugar Land, Texas on April 13th. This image is a layering of five, 30 second exposures taken with a Canon 30D at ISO 500, f/5.6 with a 10-22mm lens. The top of the image is close to the zenith. The left side of the image is west and the right side of the image is northwest. The slight flare at the top of the image is from the moon.


February 17, 2008

ISS in the sky

A combination of four 30-second exposures of the International Space Station as seen from Sugar Land, Texas at around 7:37 CST. Taken with a Canon 30D at ISO 400, f/5.6 with a 10-22mm lens. The right side of the image is looking west and the left side of the image is looking south.

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